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Chemical Threats

None of us like to consider the possibility of a chemical attack but arming yourself with information could be the difference between life and death. Chemical warfare is different from the use of traditional conventional weapons because the destructive effects of chemical weapons are not caused by any explosive force. As a result chemical weapons are desired by terrorist organization, and are thought of as an ideal choice for a weapon. With this in mind it is important that individuals are aware of the risks associated with chemical attacks and how to prepare for them.

1. Go to an interior room that is above ground level and without windows, if possible. In the case of a chemical threat, an above-ground location is preferable because some chemicals are heavier than air, and may seep into basements even if the windows are closed.

2. If directed by local authorities on the radio, use duct tape to seal all cracks around the door and any vents into the room. Tape plastic sheeting, such as heavy-duty plastic garbage bags, over any windows.

3. Lock doors and close windows and air vents. Close and lock all windows and exterior doors.

4. If an attack occurs, stay away from the area. Be prepared to improvise and use what you have on hand to seal gaps so that you create a barrier between yourself and any contamination.

5. Awarenewss is important - Report suspicious activity, packages, or conditions to your local law enforcement. Be aware of security conditions by monitoring news sources to learn of changes in the advisory system and specific areas of concern.

6. Avoid unsafe conditions due to overcrowding, poor lighting, or limited emergency exits. Be aware of your surroundings.

7. Identify exits, life safety equipment, building shelter areas, and emergency telephones. turn on air conditioning for maximum drying in summer; open windows to speed drying in winter.

8. Be aware of potential hazards in your home, neighbourhood and community.

About the Author
Francesca Black has worked in the emergency services field for more than 10 years. More information available at Prepare for Emergency http://www.prepare-for-emergency.com

 
 
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