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Fire Damage

Whether the fire is large or small care during cleanup can often be the key to salvaging what remains.

1. It is critical that home owners take pictures of damaged areas and inventory the contents of each room. Insurance companies will use this information to make a value assessment. In fact it is a good practice to maintain an inventory of important home items before tragedy strikes. Lists should be kept in a safety deposit box or fire safe. Content lists can also be stored on CDs or computer media for easy updating and retrieval.

2. While surveying the damage keep hands clean. Soot on hands can transfer to upholstery, walls, and woodwork causing more damage.

3. Retain a contractor to board up open windows, roofs, or other penetrations in order to prevent additional damage, from the elements or curious intruders.

4. Use a cotton cloth to wipe or attempt to wash fire residues from walls, ceilings or other absorbent surfaces. Wipe or attempt to wash fire residues from walls ceilings or other absorbent surfaces. It is also important to wipe leaves of houseplants clean to remove smoke residue.

5. Blow off or brush-vacuum loose smoke particles from upholstery, drapery and carpet. Vacuum glass particles from carpet and upholstery, taking care not to walk in bare feet in the glass residue. Lift draperies off carpet and hang on drapery rod via looping through a coat hanger. You should not use household cleaners on fabrics or carpet without consulting with your professional cleaner.

6. Do not use televisions or other appliances while standing on wet carpet or floors.

7. Discard exposed open food packages. The food is probably contaminated.

8 Send smoked garments to an ordinary dry cleaner. Improper cleaning may set smoke and odor.

About the Author
Francesca Black has worked in the emergency services field for more than 10 years. More information available at Prepare for Emergency http://www.prepare-for-emergency.com

 
 
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